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understanding-the-flexibility-of-wikid

There is a lot of flexibility in WiKID. It can be daunting.

Each WiKID token client supports multiple domains across multiple servers. This means that one token can replace all a users passwords if those services support WiKID. WiKID becomes like a key chain of hardware tokens.

Each user can have multiple tokens. So you can have a corporate PC client, a wireless client on your Blackberry and a home PC client. These tokens may have the same WiKID domains on them or not. The only way a user can establish a second token on the same domain, though, is with a valid passcode from the first token. (This requirement prevents a rogue admin from setting up tokens without the user’s knowledge.)

Tokens can be wired or wireless. We support both a PC-based token client (Windows, Mac and Linux) and wireless (Blackberry, Palm, J2ME, PocketPC), or both as mentioned above.

Users can be set up automatically or manually. WiKID is unique among two-factor authentication systems in that users can be completely set up without an administrator’s assistance. Users can also be validated manually and re-validated immediately by an administrator.

Each domain can have its own security requirements. Minimum PIN length, passcode lifetime, max bad PIN attempts before lock-out and max bad passcode attempts can all be configured by the administrator.

WiKID is open source and commercial. As a free, open source solution WiKID makes sense for services that typically only require a password for security because WiKID is easier for end-users (who only have to remember a PIN) and far more secure. Yet, authentication is a very key element of network security, so support services and commercial add-ons are important too.
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